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Microvillus inclusion disease

Orpha number ORPHA2290
Synonym(s) Congenital microvillous atrophy
Congenital microvillus atrophy
MVID
Microvillous inclusion disease
Prevalence <1 / 1 000 000
Inheritance Autosomal recessive
Age of onset Infancy
Neonatal
ICD-10
  • P78.3
ICD-O -
OMIM
UMLS
  • C0341306
MeSH -
MedDRA
  • 10068494

Summary

Microvillous inclusion disease (MVID) or microvillous atrophy is a congenital disorder of the intestinal epithelial cells that presents with persistent life-threatening watery diarrhea and is characterized by morphological enterocyte abnormalities. MVID manifests either in the first days of life (early-onset form) or in the first two months (late-onset form) of life. MVID is a very rare disorder of unknown origin, probably transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. To date, no prevalence data are available. Ultrastructural analyses reveal: 1) a partial to total atrophy of microvilli on mature enterocytes with apical accumulation of numerous secretory granules in immature enterocytes; 2) the highly characteristic inclusion bodies containing rudimentary or fully differentiated microvilli in mature enterocytes. Light microscopy shows accumulation of PAS-positive granules at the apical pole of immature enterocytes, together with atrophic band indicating microvillus atrophy and, in parallel, an intracellular PAS or CD10 positive line (marking the microvillous inclusion bodies seen on electron microscopy). Intestinal failure secondary to diarrhea is definitive. To date, no curative therapy exists and children with MVID are totally dependent on parenteral nutrition. Long-term outcome is generally poor, due to metabolic decompensation, repeated states of dehydration, infectious and liver complications related to the parenteral nutrition. As MVID is a very rare disorder, which is extremely difficult to diagnose and manage, children with MVID should be transferred to specialized pediatric gastro-intestinal centers, if possible, a center equipped to perform small bowel transplantation. Early small bowel transplantation resulting in intestinal autonomy gives new hope for disease management and outcome.

Expert reviewer(s)

  • Pr Olivier GOULET
  • Dr Frank M. RUEMMELE
  • Pr Jacques SCHMITZ

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Detailed information

Review article
  • EN (2006)
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